The Speaker, Ellen Fullman, Beatriz Ferreyra, Charlemagne Palestine…

Curator and producer Manuela Benetton announces the continuation of her event series in the unusual and encompassing setting of various Berlin churches, which explore the power of experimental electronic music to generate a sense of connectivity between listeners and performers.

With past events hosting the rare appearance of Japanese improv collective Marginal Consort, American minimalist Terry Riley, avant-garde legends Nurse With Wound, and the debut of Merzbow, Keiji Haino and Balász Pándi in Berlin, now she presents three more concerts, the final in the series.

Pan Daijing‘s new collaborative project with Valerio Tricoli and Werner Dafeldecker, Beatriz Ferreyra, Ellen Fullman‘s solo show and with Konrad Sprenger; Stine Janvin‘s and a rare appearance of Charlemagne Palestine on the organ.

The Speaker + Beatriz Ferreyra

On September 16th Pan Daijing, Valerio Tricoli and Werner Dafeldecker will premiere their first collaborative project The Speaker at Elisabethkirche.

An innovative composition for spoken language, six onstage loudspeakers and live electronics, The Speaker can be seen as a form of “aural theatre” or preformative piece of “musique concrète” exploring the interlocking themes of solipsism, paranoia and identity. The growing tension between the immediacy of vocal sounds and their human carrier (Pan Daijing) is questioned in relation to the artificial system of electronics: the performer and the loudspeakers act at times as separated, incompatible subjects, at times in dialogue. Eventually a transformation of metamorphosis of one into the other is achieved in a relationship of meanings forever in escape.

Opening the night is Argentinian acousmatic composer Beatriz Ferreyra. The singular artist with a passion for unusual sounds and esoteric approaches to attaining knowledge is given carte blanche for the evening to play a selection of her works.

For all Beatriz Ferreyra’s use of technology, something vivid and wild about her music gives the suggestion of the organic, even as the music is composed and controlled with extreme precision… Ferreyra manages to occupy an idiosyncratic position where she almost stands alone. Her pieces are possessed by an almost phantasmagoric intensity.
— Richard Thomas, The WIRE

This event is presented in collaboration with The Wire, Crack Magazine, and Berlin Community Radio. Supported by: Initiative Neue Musik e.V., Deutschlandradio Kultur, Hauptstadt München Kulturreferat.

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Ellen Fullman (solo) + Ellen Fullman / Konrad Sprenger

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Following, on October 7th in the majestic setting of Villa Elisabeth, American artist Ellen Fullman will spend four days in the villa to prepare her unique Long String Instrument to preform to a wider audience in Berlin. Self-designed, and tuned in just- intonation, the strings range in length from about thirteen to thirty meters, and are usually organized in multiple groupings. There is a footpath between the pairs of strings that Fullman walks up and down with the poise of a dancer, her rosined fingers gliding along the stainless-steel wires like a bow on an enormous violin.

Fullman’s Long String Instrument creates a sense of majestic vastness, its lines stretching off towards an implied infinity. – Biba Kopf, The Wire

On the same night, Ellen Fullman will play her duo with Berlin-based long-time- collaborator Jörg Hiller (aka Konrad Sprenger, PAN) on computer-controlled multichannel electric guitar. Ellen Fullman and Konrad Sprenger have collaborated since 2001 and released their internationally acclaimed album Ort on Choose in 2004.

Charlemagne Palestine + Stine Janvin

Closing the series is a special appearance by American self-described “maximalist composer” Charlemagne Palestine on the massive organ of the Sophienkirche. A contemporary of Terry Riley, Phill Niblock, and Steve Reich, Palestine plays intense, ritualistic music intended to unsettle audiences’ expectations of what is beautiful and meaningful in music. A composer-performer originally trained to be a cantor, in this concert Palestine will construct overtone clusters sounding like a waterfall and absorbing the listeners in the surrounding architecture of the church.

In a similar way, composer and performer Stine Janvin shifts the focus towards the acoustic and psychoacoustic effects of repetitive, though deconstructed patterns and rave rhythms. Stine employs her voice to imitate multi-layered synthesizer sequences, light and darkness to disorient our perception, and create unnatural aural soundscapes of almost mystical beauty.

The two final shows are presented in collaboration with The Wire, Crack Magazine, and Berlin Community Radio. Supported by Musicboard.

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